ABSTRACT

The home is getting more and more connected.

Smart sensors are monitoring systems and activities and, in many cases, working together to enhance the efficiency and capability of your home.

It’s the dream of the Internet of Things (IoT), and it’s becoming a reality in our homes. But the smart home can become a security nightmare because every connected device is a new potential entry point for cyberattacks.

Criminals are looking for vulnerabilities to gain access to connected devices in the home to steal personal data and even break into the premises. Once inside, they can quickly pivot to target service provider networks and content and mount larger-scale attacks

This paper looks at the common attack scenarios and presents an approach to mitigate this challenge, which, if unchecked, will result in a lower adoption rate by consumers.

INTRODUCTION

Your smart thermostat automatically adjusts the temperature when you’re away. Your washing machine and dishwasher communicate with each other to save on power and water costs.

Connected surveillance cameras remotely notify you when the package you’ve been waiting for is delivered to your doorstep. And your connected TVs, tablets, and home audio equipment put the world’s digital content at your fingertips.

It’s the dream of the Internet of Things (IoT), and it’s becoming a reality in our homes. But the smart home can become a security nightmare because every connected device is a new potential entry point for cyber-attacks.

Criminals are looking for vulnerabilities to gain access to connected devices in the home to steal personal data and even break into the premises. Once inside, they can quickly pivot to target service provider networks and content and mount larger-scale attacks.

This paper provides an overview of the challenges of securing the home against these attacks and presents an approach to secure the home via a combination of capabilities in the residential gateway and cloud through a development known as HomeGuard.

THE EXPLOSION OF THE INTERNET OF EVERYTHING

Technology is quickly changing the way we interact with the world around us.

Today, companies are developing products for the consumer market that would have been unimaginable a decade ago: Internet-connected cameras that allow you to post pictures online with a single click; home automation systems that turn on your front porch light when you leave work; and bracelets that share with your friends how far you have biked or run during the day.

These are all examples of the Internet of Things (“IoT”), an interconnected environment where all manner of objects have a digital presence and the ability to communicate with other objects and people.

The IoT explosion is already around us, in the form of wearable computers, smart health trackers, connected smoke detectors and light bulbs, and essentially any other Internet-connected device that isn’t a mobile phone, tablet, or traditional computer.

Consumer adoption of network-connected devices, such as in-home smart appliances and wearable technology, is on the rise.

Thirty percent of consumers already own or plan to purchase an in-home IoT device in the next two years. In-home IoT devices include smart thermostats, self-driving vacuum cleaners and smart refrigerators.

While consumer adoption of connected technology will be more gradual in the short term, widespread adoption will be inevitable over the next five years.

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